Engage Early Readers Through Interactive Learning Experiences

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Engage Early Readers Through Interactive Learning Experiences

LeapFrog Literacy Expert Provides Tips and Advice to Help Parents Empower Early Readers

EMERYVILLE, Calif., March 1 -- While children who are learning to read benefit from formal systematic instruction, parents can actually aid their children's development just as much by ensuring that early literacy experiences are also active and fun. Providing this insight, Carolyn Jaynes, PhD, former teacher and literacy expert for LeapFrog Enterprises, Inc. (NYSE:LF), celebrates reading in honor of National March into Literacy Month.

(Logo:  http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20090219/LFLOGO)

While learning to read might not be all fun and games, studies have shown that children who are more engaged readers regularly outperform students who are less engaged in what they are reading. Developing skills such as being able to name letters and their sounds, quickly name objects or colors, remember spoken information for a short period of time, and write letters are essential steps to becoming a fluent reader; but learning to love reading might be just as important for long-term reading success.

"Engaging children in activities that foster a love of language and reading is critical for young readers," says Jaynes. "With reading ability so closely linked to a student's overall academic success, the pathway to becoming a motivated, lifelong reader includes engaging children in literacy activities that extend beyond the written word. Yes, the more children read, the stronger readers they become, but parents may be surprised to learn that many other activities - some of which they probably already do - can be valuable building blocks for reading success."

Parents and caregivers can create learning experiences that inspire and resonate with their children by following Jaynes' simple tips.  Jaynes strives not only to get even the youngest children on the road to reading, but on the road to love reading. More information can be found at http://www.learntoreadlovetoread.com.

Reading Tips and Resources from Carolyn Jaynes, PhD, LeapFrog's Literacy Expert

  --  Hunt for letters and words wherever you are. Maximize the endless
      learning opportunities around you any given day by playing "find the
      letter" games with your children. Spot letters and words on a cereal
      box at breakfast, on signs at the park, or even in a text message from
      daddy.
  --  Turn the tables during story time. Let your child "read" to you from a
      favorite book. Ask them to look at the pictures and tell you about the
      story - you may be surprised at how much of the story your child
      actually comprehends.
  --  Find ways to bring books to life.  When you read aloud, "voice" the
      characters and add drama to the narration.  Educational products like
      LeapFrog's Tag Reading System can support independent reading time by
      encouraging children to bring books to life on their own.
  --  Go on a rhyming treasure hunt. Help your child find items in the house
      or around the neighborhood that rhyme with a chosen object. Turn it
      into a song.
  --  Play listening games. Being able to understand and remember words and
      phrases in sequence is an integral part of literacy development. Try a
      version of Simon Says with an increasing number of commands in a row,
      such as "Simon Says, touch your nose." "Simon says touch your nose,
      then jump." "Simon Says touch your nose, then jump, then turn around."
  --  Play beat-the-clock. Help your child link objects to names by opening
      a book or magazine and asking them to point to and name as many
      letters, numbers, objects or colors as they can in 30 seconds.

  About LeapFrog

LeapFrog Enterprises, Inc. is a leading designer, developer, and marketer of innovative, technology-based learning products and related proprietary content, dedicated to making learning effective and engaging for all ages, at home and in schools, around the world. The company was founded in 1995 and is based in Emeryville, California. LeapFrog has developed a family of learning platforms that come to life with an extensive library of software titles covering important subjects such as phonics, reading, writing, math, music, geography, social studies, spelling, vocabulary and science. In addition, the company has created a broad line of stand-alone educational products for children. LeapFrog's award-winning products are available in four languages at major retailers in more than 44 countries around the world and in more than 100,000 classrooms across the United States.

LEAPFROG, the LeapFrog logo and TAG are trademarks or registered trademarks of LeapFrog Enterprises, Inc. Copyright © 2009 LeapFrog Enterprises, Inc. All rights reserved. All other trademarks are property of their respective owners.

  Media Contacts:
  Kathryn Green
  Access Communications for LeapFrog
  teamleapfrog@accesspr.com
  (415) 844-6219

  Margaux Vega
  LeapFrog Enterprises Inc.
  mvega@leapfrog.com
  (510) 596-5442

Photo:  http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20090219/LFLOGO
AP Archive: http://photoarchive.ap.org/
PRN Photo Desk, photodesk@prnewswire.com/
           
Source: LeapFrog Enterprises, Inc.
   

CONTACT:  Kathryn Green of Access Communications, +1-415-844-6219,
teamleapfrog@accesspr.com, for LeapFrog Enterprises, Inc.; or Margaux Vega of
LeapFrog Enterprises Inc., +1-510-596-5442, mvega@leapfrog.com

Web Site:  http://www.leapfrog.com/

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