Steelpad S&S

Author
Aron Schatz
Posted
August 22, 2004
Views
41364
Steelpad S&S
The S&S is the next step in the Steelpad line. It is an evolutionary step from the 4D. With a bigger and better pad, let's see if the S&S is worth your money...

Page 1: Steelpad

<B>Intro</B>:

I have long been a fan of Steelpad and Icemat, they are the only pads that I have reviewed. While I did not like the original metal Steelpad, the plastic ones are great. The S&S continues the plastic line and offers more than the 4D including a larger surface area and a smaller height. Let's get right into it.

<B>Packaging</B>:

<center>Box</center>

The packaging shows the basics and the box is pretty much the size of the pad itself. Don't worry too much about the flimsy box, the Steelpad comes with another protective layer.

<B>Sleeve</B>:

<center>Sleeve</center>

Now, I for one don't know what I'd use this for, but some people may find it useful (Lan party-ers come to mind). It is a carry sleeve for the pad that give it extra protection on the move. There is a zipper around it, but no handle. It would be more useful if I could carry it.

<B>The Pad</B>:

<center>View 1</center>

Look at this thing, it's huge! You usually don't read anything like that from me Wink. Anyway, the pad is much bigger than the 4D, so you'll have to determine whether you have enough space on your desk for it.

<center>View 2</center>

Diagonally, there is a 16 inch span from each corner. Top to bottom it is 10.5 inches and from side to side it is 12.5 inches. There is a great deal of surface area to work with on this pad. It is perfect if you've wanted a large pad.

<center>View 3</center>

The S&S also improves on something that I hate in mouse pads; the height. Nothing is worse that having to raise your wrist to use a mouse pad. I for one do not want carporal tunnel. Having a pad that is nearly desk level is great, less strain on my wrist. It is nearly have the height of the original 4D.

<center>Bottom</center>

The bottom of the pad is lined with a random surface of plastic holders. This keeps the pad nice and still, even in intense action. It also keeps the pad from bowing under center pressure. The pad is mad out of a hard plastic, so don't try to bend it.

<B>Testing</B>:

Since I've received the pad, I've been using it for everything. It is better than the 4D in every way, but it isn't without its shortcomings. The main problem I have with the pad is the logo.

<center>Steel</center>

This is located on the bottom left of the pad, in an area I consider to be of high traffic. For some reason, the tracking of my MX700 gets screwy around the logo. I don't know why this is, but it is annoying. The tracking on the rest of the pad is flawless of course. Steelpads have come a long way, and this is the best one yet. I love the fact it is low to the desk, I can't stress this enough. Once you feel the pad, you'll know what I mean.

<B>Conclusion</B>:

<a href="https://www.steelpad.com/shop/default.asp?main=products">$40 for a mouse pad</a> seems quite high to me. I probably wouldn't buy this, but I'm not the type to spend money on stuff like that. Though, after testing it, I can't not recommend it. Granted, you do need to blow $40 on this thing, but whether it is worth it or not is up to you. I consider the strain reduction worth the price.

I'd like to thank Danny from <a href="http://www.softtrading.info">Softtrading</a> for making this review possible.

Title

Medium Image View Large